‘The Prophet’s Poet festival’ opens

 11 Apr 2016 - 2:33

‘The Prophet’s Poet festival’ opens

 

 

Officials view some of the exhibits at the festival.

DOHA: Katara Cultural Village yesterday launched ‘The Prophet’s (PBUH) Poet festival’ under the theme ‘Poetry’s beauty blossoms when describing the best of mankind’.
Katara has dedicated a number of distinct awards. The first place winning entry will get $300,000. The second place $200,000, third place $100,000, fourth place $50,000 and fifth place $25,000. The opening ceremony was held with the participation of 30 finalists at the Opera House. The jury panel at the final stage will select five poets for the awards over the course of the festival’s five days. 
The General Manager of the Cultural Village Foundation, Dr. Khalid bin Ibrahim Al Sulaiti said: “The festival seeks to encourage people to preserve poetry as it helps to instil Islamic values in the minds of many, preserving heritage across generations. Poetry may also be utilised to convey the peaceful message of Islam while defending it against the vicious calls of those adamant to distort the true image of the religion. Poetry since long had a strong impact on the youth and their emotions. Therefore, another aim of this festival is to sharpen the talents of the youth and walk them through this process by using their poetry for the service of Islam.”
The ceremony held in the presence of the poet Dr. Abdulrahman Ashmawi, Nasheed artist, Ahmad Abdulhakim Al Saddi and guest of honour Sheikh Dr. Mohammed Al Araifi. Events were organized including an exhibition of Arab calligraphy wit 50 paintings featuring Quranic verses that highlight the good deeds of Prophet Muhammad (Peace Be Upon Him). A Another exhibition “Complementing the Messenger” by poets across all ages is also organized during the event. The festival also includes seminars among 30 poets and lectures focusing on the message of peace and love of Prophet Muhammad (Peace Be Upon Him).
A section of the festival, titled “Towards the love of Prophet Muhammad (PBUH)” includes a number of competitions and activities for those in attendance. 
Entries were submitted from across the Arab World and beyond, with poems originating from Oman to North Africa. 
Most participants hailed from Iraq and the wider Levant region, as 250 poems were submitted from these nations, while Egypt and Sudan joined with 236 poems. 
The remaining North African Arab states provided 184 poems, 145 poems came from the GCC and Yemen, while 13 poems arrived from non-Arab states. Of the total entries 60 were contributed by women.The Peninsula