Indonesian coffee aroma delights envoys’ wives

 29 Nov 2017 - 2:00

Indonesian coffee aroma delights envoys’ wives
The wives of ambassadors from Asian and European embassies as well as expatriates from various countries sample various Indonesian coffees at the event .

The Peninsula

The wives of ambassadors from Asian and European embassies as well as expatriates from various countries have sampled various Indonesian coffees including one of the most expensive coffees in the world.
The coffee tasting was led by Chairperson of Dharma Wanita Persatuan of Indonesia Embassy (Indonesian Women Organisation of Embassy), Andi Una at the Indonesian Ambassador residence recently in Doha.
Indonesian Ambassador to Qatar, Air Marshal (Ret) Muhammad Basri Sidehabi, praised the role and contribution of the Indonesian women through their activities promoting Indonesian beverages particularly coffee. It is to support the mission of the Indonesian Embassy as a part of multi track diplomacy in Qatar.
According to Una, the event was organised to strengthen cooperation among various embassies and expatriates particularly from Asean member countries.
The event aimed not only to share Indonesian coffee to the envoys’ wives but also as part of strengthening the cuisine diplomacy to fill their spare time.
“It is a socio-cultural activity to promote friendship while learning,” said Una.
Una also introduced one of the well-known Indonesian coffee, Kopi luwak or civet coffee. It is a kind of coffee that includes part-digested coffee cherries eaten and defecated by the Asian palm civet. Producers of the coffee beans argue that the process may improve coffee through two mechanisms, selection and digestion. Selection occurs if the civets choose to eat cherries. Digestive mechanisms may improve the flavour profile of the coffee beans that have been eaten. The civet eats the cherries for the fleshy pulp, then in the digestive tract, fermentation occurs.  According Indonesian expatriate who is also coffee specialist, Keke, although Kopi Luwak is a form of processing rather than a variety of coffee, it has been called one of the most expensive coffees in the world. The retail prices may reach up to €550 /US$700 per kilogram. Kopi luwak is produced mainly on the islands of Sumatra, Java, Bali and Sulawesi in the Indonesian Archipelago.