Stating the obvious

 06 Jun 2013 - 3:11

 

 

So much has been said about US foreign policy, but reports issued by the US State Department on freedoms and human rights practices depend on objective standards and criteria in general. These standards deserve to be observed and taken into account. And this is what international scientific and academic institutions do.

Arab political and media organisations greet these reports with denouncements, condemnation, blame, attack and rejection in a bid to justify their oppressive policies and their insistence on preserving the status quo.  

The State Department’s latest report on Arab countries says that despite the eruption of the Arab Spring revolutions in the Middle East, many citizens in these countries still do not enjoy liberties and eagerly look forward to tasting the freedoms others enjoy.

The report lashes out at what it describes as the deteriorating human rights situation and continuing political turmoil, absence of security and disrespect for law, even in Arab countries where the revolutions have erupted.

It criticises assaults against and sexual harassment of women. It says these assaults are used as a political tool. 

It also slams the failure of Arab governments to prosecute perpetrators of violence against minorities. It refers to growing threats to press freedoms and assaults on journalists. 

In addition, the report refers to a rise in sectarian and ethnic violence in Arab countries, particularly in Iraq. 

It criticises the lack of transparency in government, corruption in all levels of the government and society, arbitrary detentions and restrictions on freedom in these countries.

This year’s State Department report also addresses the condition of liberties and human rights in the Gulf states. It sheds light on many problematic issues, including arbitrary arrests and the restriction of civil liberties, such as freedom of the press, freedom of assembly and the freedom to form associations.

Furthermore, the report mentions prolonged detention of suspects before trial, the inability of citizens to change their government, lack of transparency, absence of an independent judiciary, and restrictions imposed on freedom of expression and communication via the Internet, including social networking websites.  

The report addresses the problem of statelessness and children born to women from the Gulf countries who are married to foreigners. It also focuses on the issues of health, professional safety and the treatment of foreign labourers.         

The truth is that we do not need a US State Department report to expose what is being hidden here. The issues the report addresses can no longer be concealed in this era of open space and social networking websites. 

What we need is to stop these practices forever, to help citizens in the Gulf and everywhere else in the Arab world enjoy freedom and security like the citizens of other countries. 

 

 

So much has been said about US foreign policy, but reports issued by the US State Department on freedoms and human rights practices depend on objective standards and criteria in general. These standards deserve to be observed and taken into account. And this is what international scientific and academic institutions do.

Arab political and media organisations greet these reports with denouncements, condemnation, blame, attack and rejection in a bid to justify their oppressive policies and their insistence on preserving the status quo.  

The State Department’s latest report on Arab countries says that despite the eruption of the Arab Spring revolutions in the Middle East, many citizens in these countries still do not enjoy liberties and eagerly look forward to tasting the freedoms others enjoy.

The report lashes out at what it describes as the deteriorating human rights situation and continuing political turmoil, absence of security and disrespect for law, even in Arab countries where the revolutions have erupted.

It criticises assaults against and sexual harassment of women. It says these assaults are used as a political tool. 

It also slams the failure of Arab governments to prosecute perpetrators of violence against minorities. It refers to growing threats to press freedoms and assaults on journalists. 

In addition, the report refers to a rise in sectarian and ethnic violence in Arab countries, particularly in Iraq. 

It criticises the lack of transparency in government, corruption in all levels of the government and society, arbitrary detentions and restrictions on freedom in these countries.

This year’s State Department report also addresses the condition of liberties and human rights in the Gulf states. It sheds light on many problematic issues, including arbitrary arrests and the restriction of civil liberties, such as freedom of the press, freedom of assembly and the freedom to form associations.

Furthermore, the report mentions prolonged detention of suspects before trial, the inability of citizens to change their government, lack of transparency, absence of an independent judiciary, and restrictions imposed on freedom of expression and communication via the Internet, including social networking websites.  

The report addresses the problem of statelessness and children born to women from the Gulf countries who are married to foreigners. It also focuses on the issues of health, professional safety and the treatment of foreign labourers.         

The truth is that we do not need a US State Department report to expose what is being hidden here. The issues the report addresses can no longer be concealed in this era of open space and social networking websites. 

What we need is to stop these practices forever, to help citizens in the Gulf and everywhere else in the Arab world enjoy freedom and security like the citizens of other countries.