A season for migration from Arab Spring

 14 Nov 2013 - 6:16

There is no limit to the shock and disappointment caused by the dire condition of the Arab world. Even after revolutions swept through this part of the world, the result is frustrating. 

The latest report of the United Nations Development Programme and the International Labour Organisation says that economic policies and the weakness of democratic and economic governance sends economic initiatives off course. 

The report adds that the Arab region has the highest rates of migration among educated and skilled people. Unemployment among educated youth equalled or exceeded that among the less educated or uneducated in many countries in the region, the report added. It says educated workers do not get higher salaries compared to less educated workers.

The report raised questions about the reasons pushing youngsters to expose themselves to risks when they leave their countries illegally, although the spectre of dictatorship and corruption has disappeared from these countries.

The Tunisian Forum for Economic and Social Rights has pointed out in a survey that 46 percent of the illegal migrants are between the ages of 15 and 24. 

The forum added that students constitute a large proportion of those migrants. This new trend reflects the awareness among this category of migrants of the economic hurdles they face. This is why they try to find a solution early on in their lives.

The survey showed that the majority of illegal migrants come from impoverished neighbourhoods in the capital or rural areas. Syrian refugees get aboard fishing boats from Egypt in hazardous trips. The results of these trips are always unknown, but this does not prevent these refugees from risking their lives and spending a lot of money to reach the shores of Europe to apply for asylum. 

In Iraq, however, Abdel Kareem Al Lamy pointed out that in addition to many factors, including political unrest, security conditions and poverty, migration represents the Arab youth’s urgent desire to search for their self and invest their energy to achieve their ambitions.  

The Arab world has turned into a place incapable of tolerating its people; it has turned into an infected area that repels the average and simple person who looks for a decent living, let alone the gifted and talented and those who are exceptional.

There is no limit to the shock and disappointment caused by the dire condition of the Arab world. Even after revolutions swept through this part of the world, the result is frustrating. 

The latest report of the United Nations Development Programme and the International Labour Organisation says that economic policies and the weakness of democratic and economic governance sends economic initiatives off course. 

The report adds that the Arab region has the highest rates of migration among educated and skilled people. Unemployment among educated youth equalled or exceeded that among the less educated or uneducated in many countries in the region, the report added. It says educated workers do not get higher salaries compared to less educated workers.

The report raised questions about the reasons pushing youngsters to expose themselves to risks when they leave their countries illegally, although the spectre of dictatorship and corruption has disappeared from these countries.

The Tunisian Forum for Economic and Social Rights has pointed out in a survey that 46 percent of the illegal migrants are between the ages of 15 and 24. 

The forum added that students constitute a large proportion of those migrants. This new trend reflects the awareness among this category of migrants of the economic hurdles they face. This is why they try to find a solution early on in their lives.

The survey showed that the majority of illegal migrants come from impoverished neighbourhoods in the capital or rural areas. Syrian refugees get aboard fishing boats from Egypt in hazardous trips. The results of these trips are always unknown, but this does not prevent these refugees from risking their lives and spending a lot of money to reach the shores of Europe to apply for asylum. 

In Iraq, however, Abdel Kareem Al Lamy pointed out that in addition to many factors, including political unrest, security conditions and poverty, migration represents the Arab youth’s urgent desire to search for their self and invest their energy to achieve their ambitions.  

The Arab world has turned into a place incapable of tolerating its people; it has turned into an infected area that repels the average and simple person who looks for a decent living, let alone the gifted and talented and those who are exceptional.