Militarisation of Syrian revolution

 28 Mar 2013 - 5:20

 

After the revolution in Syria entered its third year, the Arab League has finally admitted that revolution has erupted in one of its member states, and decided to offer Syria’s vacant seat to the National Coalition until the formation of an elected government.

UN-Arab League envoy Lakhdar Brahimi has previously warned that unless the international community brings to an end the conflict in Syria in 2013, there is a high possibly of collapse of the state in Syria. Brahimi said Syria may turn into another Somalia and the number of fatalities will rise to more than 100,000.

Despite Brahimi’s warnings, the Arab League has kept issuing statements and calling on different parties to find a solution to the conflict.

Notwithstanding its late decision, the Arab League still does not know how to support the revolution and how member states can provide the Syrian opposition with weapons to defend themselves against the Assad regime’s armoury.

The tragic situation in Syria and the hesitation to support the revolution is very similar to what happened with the Libyans and Yemenis, who finally got support through International resolutions and GCC initiatives, respectively. The delays in providing support resulted in increasing extremism and militarisation of the societies in those countries.

Recently, CNN aired the story of a man in his twenties who was an active participant in the peaceful Syrian uprising, but later resorted to arms when they were confronted with tanks and rockets of the regime. Gradually, he found himself in Al Nusra Front, the most effective group fighting the Assad regime.

Ruthless civil war is now raging inside Syria and the state has become paralyzed and could be considered one of the failed states, according to the international classification of such states. Co-existence among the different sections of society has become more difficult as revenge and hatred prevail everywhere in the country. 

At the international level, Syria has lost its independence and has become a plaything in the hands of regional and international players who invest in killing, exporting weapons and hiring mercenaries to fight the bloody Ba’ath regime, which is backed by Moscow and Tehran.

Has the train of the Arab Spring revolution come to screeching halt at the borders of Damascus? Has the world lost hope of finding a peaceful political settlement or democratic alternative to the violence in Syria? 

It is said that when a former prisoner becomes jailer he does what his jailers did. Everybody in the Arab world has made his own contribution to creating prisoners and jailers, and we are reaping what we sowed.

 

 

After the revolution in Syria entered its third year, the Arab League has finally admitted that revolution has erupted in one of its member states, and decided to offer Syria’s vacant seat to the National Coalition until the formation of an elected government.

UN-Arab League envoy Lakhdar Brahimi has previously warned that unless the international community brings to an end the conflict in Syria in 2013, there is a high possibly of collapse of the state in Syria. Brahimi said Syria may turn into another Somalia and the number of fatalities will rise to more than 100,000.

Despite Brahimi’s warnings, the Arab League has kept issuing statements and calling on different parties to find a solution to the conflict.

Notwithstanding its late decision, the Arab League still does not know how to support the revolution and how member states can provide the Syrian opposition with weapons to defend themselves against the Assad regime’s armoury.

The tragic situation in Syria and the hesitation to support the revolution is very similar to what happened with the Libyans and Yemenis, who finally got support through International resolutions and GCC initiatives, respectively. The delays in providing support resulted in increasing extremism and militarisation of the societies in those countries.

Recently, CNN aired the story of a man in his twenties who was an active participant in the peaceful Syrian uprising, but later resorted to arms when they were confronted with tanks and rockets of the regime. Gradually, he found himself in Al Nusra Front, the most effective group fighting the Assad regime.

Ruthless civil war is now raging inside Syria and the state has become paralyzed and could be considered one of the failed states, according to the international classification of such states. Co-existence among the different sections of society has become more difficult as revenge and hatred prevail everywhere in the country. 

At the international level, Syria has lost its independence and has become a plaything in the hands of regional and international players who invest in killing, exporting weapons and hiring mercenaries to fight the bloody Ba’ath regime, which is backed by Moscow and Tehran.

Has the train of the Arab Spring revolution come to screeching halt at the borders of Damascus? Has the world lost hope of finding a peaceful political settlement or democratic alternative to the violence in Syria? 

It is said that when a former prisoner becomes jailer he does what his jailers did. Everybody in the Arab world has made his own contribution to creating prisoners and jailers, and we are reaping what we sowed.